The Cambridge Edition of The Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence

The Cambridge Edition of the Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence is an ongoing project by Cambridge University Press to produce definitive editions of the writings of D. H. Lawrence. It is a major scholarly undertaking that strives to provide new versions of the texts as close as can be determined to what the author intended.

This ongoing project, started in 1979, will eventually encompass over 40 separate volumes, each complete with a high quality critical apparatus. As such, it represents the authoritative base text for academic comment, literary criticism, reference and research.

Read more about The Cambridge Edition Of The Letters And Works Of D. H. Lawrence:  Novels, Short Stories, Poems, Plays, Non-fiction, Travel Books, Manuscripts and Early Drafts of Published Novels and Other Works, Letters

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    Unto the pure all things are pure: but unto them that are defiled and unbelieving is nothing pure; but even their mind and conscience is defiled.
    —Bible: New Testament St. Paul, in Titus, 1:15.

    See Lawrence on Puritans.

    Reason, the prized reality, the Law, is apprehended, now and then, for a serene and profound moment, amidst the hubbub of cares and works which have no direct bearing on it;Mis then lost, for months or years, and again found, for an interval, to be lost again. If we compute it in time, we may, in fifty years, have half a dozen reasonable hours.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    For Cambridge people rarely smile,
    Being urban, squat, and packed with guile.
    Rupert Brooke (1887–1915)

    Books have their destinies like men. And their fates, as made by generations of readers, are very different from the destinies foreseen for them by their authors. Gulliver’s Travels, with a minimum of expurgation, has become a children’s book; a new illustrated edition is produced every Christmas. That’s what comes of saying profound things about humanity in terms of a fairy story.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    The entire merit of a man can never be made known; nor the sum of his demerits, if he have them. We are only known by our names; as letters sealed up, we but read each other’s superscriptions.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)