The Cambridge Edition of The Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence

The Cambridge Edition of the Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence is an ongoing project by Cambridge University Press to produce definitive editions of the writings of D. H. Lawrence. It is a major scholarly undertaking that strives to provide new versions of the texts as close as can be determined to what the author intended.

This ongoing project, started in 1979, will eventually encompass over 40 separate volumes, each complete with a high quality critical apparatus. As such, it represents the authoritative base text for academic comment, literary criticism, reference and research.

Read more about The Cambridge Edition Of The Letters And Works Of D. H. Lawrence:  Novels, Short Stories, Poems, Plays, Non-fiction, Travel Books, Manuscripts and Early Drafts of Published Novels and Other Works, Letters

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