The Cambridge Edition of The Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence

The Cambridge Edition of the Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence is an ongoing project by Cambridge University Press to produce definitive editions of the writings of D. H. Lawrence. It is a major scholarly undertaking that strives to provide new versions of the texts as close as can be determined to what the author intended.

This ongoing project, started in 1979, will eventually encompass over 40 separate volumes, each complete with a high quality critical apparatus. As such, it represents the authoritative base text for academic comment, literary criticism, reference and research.

Read more about The Cambridge Edition Of The Letters And Works Of D. H. Lawrence:  Novels, Short Stories, Poems, Plays, Non-fiction, Travel Books, Manuscripts and Early Drafts of Published Novels and Other Works, Letters

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    The dons of Oxford and Cambridge are too busy educating the young men to be able to teach them anything.
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    I knew a gentleman who was so good a manager of his time that he would not even lose that small portion of it which the calls of nature obliged him to pass in the necessary-house, but gradually went through all the Latin poets in those moments. He bought, for example, a common edition of Horace, of which he tore off gradually a couple of pages, read them first, and then sent them down as a sacrifice to Cloacina: this was so much time fairly gained.
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