Sake

Sake (/ˈsɑːkeɪ/ or /ˈsɑːki/) is an alcoholic beverage of Japanese origin that is made from fermented rice. It may also be spelled saké or saki.

In the Japanese language, the word sake refers to any alcoholic beverage, while the beverage called sake in English is termed nihonshu (日本酒, "Japanese liquor").

Read more about Sake:  Overview, History

Other articles related to "sake":

Philip Harper (sake Brewer) - Current Career
... Harper used his expertise in brewing to create his own brand of sake for the brewery ... for his excellent brands of sake ... Harper continues to brew sake at Kinoshita-Shuzou, hoping to spread the taste of the traditional Japanese drink throughout the world and revive the ...
Sawanotsuru
... is one of Japan’s largest producers of sake. 1717 in Nada-ku, Kobe, a region famous for sake production ... its sake is exported to approximately 30 countries ...
Blood Brothers (Outer Space Album) - Track Listing
... Title Producer(s) Performer (s) 1 "Blood Brothers" Sake Planetary, Crypt the Warchild 2 "Reign of Chaos" DJ Soundtrax Planetary, Crypt the Warchild 3 "Spanis ...
Saijō, Hiroshima (Kamo) - Sake
... If Saijō is famed for one thing in particular, it is sake (rice wine) ... Within the narrow streets of the Sakagura Dori ("Sake Storehouse Road") area near JR Saijō Station are the Namako wall (white-lattice walled) and Sekishu Gawara (red-roof tile) roofs of ten well-known sake ... Each October there is also the Saijō Sake Matsuri 酒まつり (Sake Festival) which draws crowds of between 100-200,000 revelers and sake connoisseurs before the brewing season (October–March) begins ...
Sakura Sake - Track List
... "Sakura Sake" Takeshi Aida (相田 毅, Aida Takeshi?), Sho Sakurai Shin Tanimoto (谷本 新, Tanimoto Shin?) 423 2 ... "Sakura Sake" (Karaoke) Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 4 ... "Sakura Sake" Aida, Sakurai Tanimoto 423 2 ...

Famous quotes containing the word sake:

    There is always the danger that we may just do the work for the sake of the work. This is where the respect and the love and the devotion come in—that we do it to God, to Christ, and that’s why we try to do it as beautifully as possible.
    Mother Teresa (b. 1910)

    What is done for science must also be done for art: accepting undesirable side effects for the sake of the main goal, and moreover diminishing their importance by making this main goal more magnificent. For one should reform forward, not backward: social illnesses, revolutions, are evolutions inhibited by a conserving stupidity.
    Robert Musil (1880–1942)

    What are we hoping to get out of it, what’s it all in aid of—is it really just for the sake of a gloved hand waving at you from a golden coach?
    John Osborne (1929–1994)