Result

A result (also called upshot) is the final consequence of a sequence of actions or events expressed qualitatively or quantitatively. Possible results include advantage, disadvantage, gain, injury, loss, value and victory. There may be a range of possible outcomes associated with an event depending on the point of view, historical distance or relevance. Reaching no result can mean that actions are inefficient, ineffective, meaningless or flawed.

Some types of result are as follows:

  • in general, the outcome of any kind of research, action or phenomenon
  • in games (e.g. cricket, lotteries) or wars, the result includes the identity of the victorious party and possibly the effects on the environment
  • in mathematics, the final value of a calculation (e.g. arithmetic operation), function or statistical expression, or the final statement of a theorem that has been proven
  • in statistics, any information analyzed, extracted or interpolated from polls, tests or logs
  • in computer sciences, the return value of a function, state of a system or list of records matching a query (e.g. web search). The result type is the data type of the data returned by a function.
  • in science, the outcome of an experiment (e.g. see null hypothesis)
  • in forensics and justice, the proof of guilt or innocence of a suspect after evaluating evidence in a criminal investigation
  • in economics and accounting, the profit or loss at the end of a fiscal period.
  • in democracy, the election of a representative or the outcome of a vote on a subject

Read more about ResultIn Management

Other articles related to "result, results":

July Revolution - Result
... The July Column, located on Place de la Bastille, commemorates the events of the Three Glorious Days ... This renewed French Revolution sparked an August uprising in Brussels and the Southern Provinces of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, leading to separation and the establishment of the Kingdom of Belgium ...
Null Result
... In science, a null result is a result without the expected content that is, the proposed result is absent ... This does not imply a result of zero or nothing, simply a result that does not support the hypothesis ... In statistical hypothesis testing, a null result occurs when an experimental result is not significantly different from what is to be expected under the null hypothesis ...
Nephritis - Complications
... As a result, red blood cells may leak out of damaged glomeruli, causing blood to appear in the urine (hematuria) ... Loss of necessary protein due to nephritis can result in several life-threatening symptoms ... This can result in blood clots causing sudden stroke ...
IEEE Floating Point - Exception Handling
... Division by zero (an operation on finite operands gives an exact infinite result, e.g ... Overflow (a result is too large to be represented correctly) (returns ±infinity by default (for round-to-nearest mode)) ... Underflow (a result is very small (outside the normal range) and is inexact) (returns a denormalized value by default) ...
Hilbert's Problems - Table of Problems
2 !There is no consensus on whether results of Gödel and Gentzen give a solution to the problem as stated by Hilbert ... Result no, proved using Dehn invariants ... Result yes, illustrated by Gelfond's theorem or the Gelfond–Schneider theorem ...

Famous quotes containing the word result:

    What we ought to see in the agonies of puberty is the result of the conditioning that maims the female personality in creating the feminine.
    Germaine Greer (b. 1939)

    We achieve “active” mastery over illness and death by delegating all responsibility for their management to physicians, and by exiling the sick and the dying to hospitals. But hospitals serve the convenience of staff not patients: we cannot be properly ill in a hospital, nor die in one decently; we can do so only among those who love and value us. The result is the institutionalized dehumanization of the ill, characteristic of our age.
    Thomas Szasz (b. 1920)

    Fashionable women regard themselves, and are regarded by men, as pretty toys or as mere instruments of pleasure; and the vacuity of mind, the heartlessness, the frivolity which is the necessary result of this false and debasing estimate of women, can only be fully understood by those who have mingled in the folly and wickedness of fashionable life ...
    Sarah M. Grimke (1792–1873)