Progress

Progress may refer to:

Read more about Progress:  History, Aerospace, Architecture, Business, Computer Science, Geography, Media, Politics and Government, Science

Other articles related to "progress":

Sexual Health - Millennium Development Goals
... To monitor global progress towards the achievement of this target, the United Nations has agreed on the following indicators 5.3 contraceptive prevalence rate 5.4 adolescent birth rate 5.5 antenatal care ... However, progress has been slow in most developing countries, particularly in Sub-saharan Africa, which remains the region with the poorest indicators for reproductive health ...
Demos (U.S. Think Tank) - Programs - Sustainable Progress Initiative
... Demos’ Sustainable Progress Initiative facilitates creative new research, policy development, and strategic planning to promote a new economy where the priority is to sustain human and natural communities ... New Economy," which questions the pervasive narrative linking GDP and market growth to social progress ...
Calculus (medicine) - Pathophysiology and Symptoms
... failure Can predispose to pyelonephritis (kidney infections) Can progress to urolithiasis Urolithiasis (urinary bladder stones) Can progress to bladder outlet obstruction Cholelithiasis (galls ...
Star*Drive - Contents
... The level of technology is at "Progress Level" 7 (Progress Levels are used in Alternity to describe the technology of a civilization, with present day Earth described as ...
Progress - Science
... Evolutionary progress, the idea that there is a largest-scale trend in evolution of organisms and that the trend is toward improvement ...

Famous quotes containing the word progress:

    All progress has resulted from people who took unpopular positions.
    Adlai Stevenson (1900–1965)

    The progress from an absolute to a limited monarchy, from a limited monarchy to a democracy, is a progress toward a true respect for the individual.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    An accurate charting of the American woman’s progress through history might look more like a corkscrew tilted slightly to one side, its loops inching closer to the line of freedom with the passage of time—but like a mathematical curve approaching infinity, never touching its goal. . . . Each time, the spiral turns her back just short of the finish line.
    Susan Faludi (20th century)