Political Fiction

Political fiction is a subgenre of fiction that deals with political affairs. Political fiction has often used narrative to provide commentary on political events, systems and theories. Works of political fiction often "directly criticize an existing society or... present an alternative, sometimes fantastic, reality."

Prominent pieces of political fiction have included the totalitarian dystopias of the early 20th century such as Jack London's The Iron Heel and Sinclair Lewis's It Can't Happen Here. Equally influential, if not more so, however, have been earlier pieces of political fiction such as Gulliver's Travels (1726), Candide (1759) and Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852). Political fiction frequently employs the literary modes of satire, often in the genres of Utopian and dystopian fiction or social science fiction.

Read more about Political FictionNotable Examples, Science Fiction

Other articles related to "political fiction":

Samuel Hopkins Adams - Political Fiction
... Adams was a prolific writer, who wrote fiction as well ... "Night Bus", one of Adams's many magazine stories, became the basis for the film It Happened One Night ...

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