Pazyryk Culture

The Pazyryk culture is an Iron Age archaeological culture (ca. 6th to 3rd centuries BC) identified by excavated artifacts and mummified humans found in the Siberian permafrost in the Altay Mountains and nearby Mongolia. The mummies are buried in long barrows (or "kurgans") similar to the tomb mounds of western Scythian culture in modern Ukraine. The type site are the Pazyryk burials of the Ukok Plateau. Many artifacts and human remains have been found at this location, including the Siberian Ice Princess, indicating a flourishing culture at this location that benefited from the many trade routes and caravans of merchants passing through the area. The Pazyryk are considered to have had a war-like life.

Other kurgan cemeteries associated with the culture include those of Bashadar, Tuekta, Ulandryk, Polosmak and Berel. There are so far no known sites of settlements associated with the burials, suggesting a purely nomadic lifestyle.

Other articles related to "pazyryk culture, pazyryk, culture":

Scythians - Archaeology - Pazyryk Culture
... Bronze Age Scythian burials documented by modern archaeologists include the kurgans at Pazyryk in the Ulagan (Red) district of the Altai Republic, south of Novosibirsk in the Altai ... Archaeologists have extrapolated the Pazyryk culture from these finds five large burial mounds and several smaller ones between 1925 and 1949, one opened ... The Pazyryk culture flourished between the 7th and 3rd century BC in the area associated with the Sacae ...
Pazyryk Burials - Pazyryk Culture
... Rudenko initially assigned the neutral label Pazyryk culture for these nomads and dated them to the 5th century BC ... The Pazyryk culture has since been connected to the Scythians whose similar tombs have been found across the steppes ... Altai nomads profited from the rich trade and culture passing through ...

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