Organisation of The Communist Party of The Soviet Union

The organisation of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was based on the principles of democratic centralism.

The governing body of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) was the Party Congress which initially met annually but whose meetings became less frequent, particularly under Joseph Stalin. Party Congresses would elect a Central Committee which, in turn, would elect a Politburo. Under Stalin the most powerful position in the party became the General Secretary who was elected by the Politburo. In 1952 the title of General Secretary became First Secretary and the Politburo became the Presidium before reverting to their former names under Leonid Brezhnev in 1966.

In theory, supreme power in the party was invested in the Party Congress. However, in practice the power structure became reversed and, particularly after the death of Lenin, supreme power became the domain of the General Secretary.

Read more about Organisation Of The Communist Party Of The Soviet Union:  Higher Levels, Lower Levels, Main Offices

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Organisation Of The Communist Party Of The Soviet Union - Main Offices
... General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Became synonymous with leader of the party under Joseph Stalin ... political bureau of the Central Committee and the most powerful political group of the Communist Party ... Central Committee of the Communist Party The governing body of the Party between each Congress ...

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