Mold Health Issues

Mold health issues are potentially harmful effects of molds.

Molds (also spelled "moulds") are ubiquitous in the biosphere, and mold spores are a common component of household and workplace dust. The CDC reported in a 9 June 2006 report, 'Mold Prevention Strategies and Possible Health Effects in the Aftermath of Hurricanes and Major Floods,' that “excessive exposure to mold-contaminated materials can cause adverse health effects in susceptible persons regardless of the type of mold or the extent of contamination.”. When mold spores are present in abnormally high quantities, they can present especially hazardous health risks to humans, including allergic reactions or poisoning by mycotoxins, or causing fungal infection (mycosis).

Read more about Mold Health Issues:  Mold-associated Conditions, Exposure Sources and Prevention, History

Other articles related to "mold health issues, mold":

Mold Health Issues - History
... In the 1930s, mold was identified as the cause behind the mysterious deaths of farm animals in Russia and other countries ... of rotten food grains and cereals that were heavily overgrown with the Stachybotrys mold ... This combination of increased moisture and suitable substrates contributed to increased mold growth inside buildings ...

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