Mold

The colloquial term mold (or mould; see spelling differences) is applied to a large and taxonomically diverse number of fungal species where their growth results in a moldy appearance of objects, especially food. The objects become discolored by a layer of fungal growth. Molds are fungi that grow in the form of multicellular filaments called hyphae. A connected network of these tubular branching hyphae, called a mycelium, is considered a single organism. The hyphae are generally transparent, so the mycelium appears like very fine, fluffy white threads over the surface. Cross-walls (septa) may delimit connected compartments along the hyphae, each containing one or multiple, genetically identical nuclei. The dusty texture of many molds is caused by profuse numbers of asexual spores conidia formed by differentiation at the ends of hyphae. The mode of formation and shape of these spores is traditionally used to classify the mold fungi. Many of these spores are colored, making the fungus much more obvious to the human eye at this stage in its life-cycle. In contrast, fungi that can adopt a single celled growth habit are called yeasts.

Molds are considered to be microbes and do not form a specific taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping, but can be found in the divisions Zygomycota and Ascomycota. In the past, most molds were classified within the Deuteromycota. Molds cause biodegradation of natural materials, that can be unwanted when it becomes food spoilage or damage to property. They also play important roles in biotechnology and food science in the production of various foods, beverages, antibiotics, pharmaceuticals and enzymes. Some diseases of animals and humans can be caused by molds, usually as a result of allergic sensitivity to their spores or caused by toxic compounds produced as molds grow.

Read more about Mold:  Biology, Common Molds, Food Production, Pharmaceuticals From Molds, Health Effects, Growth in Buildings and Homes

Other articles related to "mold":

Ceramic Mold Casting - Shaw Process
... silicate, alcohol, and a gelling agent to create a mold ... the item used to create the shape of the mold) is used ... Then a torch is used to ignite the mold, which causes most of the volatiles to burn-off and the formation of ceramic microcrazes (microscopic cracks) ...
Mold Prevention - Environmental Control
... These built in ventilation systems help to combat mold growth that occurs as a result of high relative humidity levels and temperature, as well poor air circulation ... use and monitoring of HVAC systems can help to prevent mold problems before they occur ... Air ventilation removes existing mold spores from the air and keeps the atmosphere relatively dry and cool ...
Mold, Flintshire - Notable People
... guitarist for Coldplay, hails from Pantymwyn (a village two miles from Mold) and attended the Alun School ... and played for and managed Mold Alexandra F.C ... was born in Mold ...
Mold (cooking Implement)
... A mold or mould is a container used in various techniques of food preparation to shape the finished dish ... The term mold may also refer to a finished dish made in such a container (e.g ... a jello mold) ...
Ceramic Mold Casting - Unicast Process
... process is very similar to the Shaw process, except it does not require the mold to be ignited and then be cured in a furnace ... Instead, the mold is partially cured so the pattern can be removed and it is then completely cured by firing it at approximately 1,900 °F (1,040 °C) ... point is cast then the firing can be skipped, because the mold has enough strength in the "green state" (un-fired) ...

Famous quotes containing the word mold:

    indolence read as abnegation,
    slattern thought styled intuition,
    every lapse forgiven, our crime
    only to cast too bold a shadow
    or smash the mold straight off.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    Odors from decaying food wafting through the air when the door is opened, colorful mold growing between a wet gym uniform and the damp carpet underneath, and the complete supply of bath towels scattered throughout the bedroom can become wonderful opportunities to help your teenager learn once again that the art of living in a community requires compromise, negotiation, and consensus.
    Barbara Coloroso (20th century)

    New York was a new and strange world. Vast, impersonal, merciless.... Always before I had felt like a person, an individual, hopeful that I could mold my life according to some desire of my own. But here in New York I was ignorant, insignificant, unimportant—one in millions whose destiny concerned no one. New York did not even know of my existence. Nor did it care.
    Agnes Smedley (1890–1950)