Mistress of The Robes - Mistress of The Robes To Queen Alexandra, 1901-1925

Mistress of The Robes To Queen Alexandra, 1901-1925

  • 1901-1912: Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry
  • 1913-1925: Winifred Cavendish-Bentinck, Duchess of Portland

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Famous quotes containing the words mistress of the, mistress of, mistress, robes and/or queen:

    Mrs. de Winter: Mrs. Danvers must be furious with me.
    Maxim de Winter: Oh, hang Mrs. Danvers! Why on earth should you be frightened of her? You behave more like an upstairs maid or something, not like the mistress of the house at all.
    Mrs. de Winter: Yes, I know I do. But I feel so uncomfortable. I try my best every day, but it’s very difficult with people looking you up and down as if you were a prize cow.
    Robert E. Sherwood (1896–1955)

    Mrs. de Winter: Mrs. Danvers must be furious with me.
    Maxim de Winter: Oh, hang Mrs. Danvers! Why on earth should you be frightened of her? You behave more like an upstairs maid or something, not like the mistress of the house at all.
    Mrs. de Winter: Yes, I know I do. But I feel so uncomfortable. I try my best every day, but it’s very difficult with people looking you up and down as if you were a prize cow.
    Robert E. Sherwood (1896–1955)

    Mrs. de Winter: Mrs. Danvers must be furious with me.
    Maxim de Winter: Oh, hang Mrs. Danvers! Why on earth should you be frightened of her? You behave more like an upstairs maid or something, not like the mistress of the house at all.
    Mrs. de Winter: Yes, I know I do. But I feel so uncomfortable. I try my best every day, but it’s very difficult with people looking you up and down as if you were a prize cow.
    Robert E. Sherwood (1896–1955)

    He held the world upon his nose
    And this-a-way he gave a fling.
    His robes and symbols, ai-hi-hi
    And that-a-way he twirled the thing.
    Sombre as fir-trees, liquid cats
    Moved in the grass without a sound.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    We have defined a story as a narrative of events arranged in their time-sequence. A plot is also a narrative of events, the emphasis falling on causality. “The king died and then the queen died” is a story. “The king died, and then the queen died of grief” is a plot. The time sequence is preserved, but the sense of causality overshadows it.
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)