Mistress of The Robes

The Mistress of the Robes is the senior lady of the British Royal Household. Formerly (as the name implies) responsible for the Queen's clothes and jewelry, the post now has the responsibility for arranging the rota of attendance of the Ladies in Waiting on the Queen, along with various duties at State ceremonies. In the past, when the Queen was a Queen regnant rather than a queen consort, the Mistress of the Robes was a political appointment, changing with the government. However, this has not been the case since the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, and Queen Elizabeth II has only had two Mistresses of the Robes in more than fifty years' reign. Queens dowager have their own Mistresses of the Robes, and in the 18th century Princesses of Wales had one too. In modern times, the Mistress of the Robes is almost always a duchess.

Read more about Mistress Of The Robes:  Mistress of The Robes To Queen Mary I, 1553-1558, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Anne, 1603-1619, Mistresses of The Robes To Queen Anne, 1704-1714, Mistresses of The Robes To Caroline, Princess of Wales, Later Queen Caroline, 1714-1737, Mistresses of The Robes To Augusta, Princess of Wales, 1736-1763, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Charlotte, 1761-1818, Mistress of The Robes To Caroline, Princess of Wales, 1795-1820, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Adelaide, 1830-1837, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Victoria, 1837-1901, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Alexandra, 1901-1925, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Mary, 1910-1953, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth, Later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, 1937-2002, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth II, 1953-present

Famous quotes containing the words robes and/or mistress:

    No beauty she doth miss,
    When all her robes are on;
    But Beauty’s self she is,
    When all her robes are gone.
    —Unknown. My Love in Her Attire (l. 5–8)

    The lover never sees personal resemblances in his mistress to her kindred or to others. His friends find in her a likeness to her mother, or her sisters, or to persons not of her blood. The lover sees no resemblance except to summer evenings and diamond mornings, to rainbows and the song of birds.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)