Mistress of The Robes

The Mistress of the Robes is the senior lady of the British Royal Household. Formerly (as the name implies) responsible for the Queen's clothes and jewelry, the post now has the responsibility for arranging the rota of attendance of the Ladies in Waiting on the Queen, along with various duties at State ceremonies. In the past, when the Queen was a Queen regnant rather than a queen consort, the Mistress of the Robes was a political appointment, changing with the government. However, this has not been the case since the death of Queen Victoria in 1901, and Queen Elizabeth II has only had two Mistresses of the Robes in more than fifty years' reign. Queens dowager have their own Mistresses of the Robes, and in the 18th century Princesses of Wales had one too. In modern times, the Mistress of the Robes is almost always a duchess.

Read more about Mistress Of The Robes:  Mistress of The Robes To Queen Mary I, 1553-1558, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth I, 1558-1603, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Anne, 1603-1619, Mistresses of The Robes To Queen Anne, 1704-1714, Mistresses of The Robes To Caroline, Princess of Wales, Later Queen Caroline, 1714-1737, Mistresses of The Robes To Augusta, Princess of Wales, 1736-1763, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Charlotte, 1761-1818, Mistress of The Robes To Caroline, Princess of Wales, 1795-1820, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Adelaide, 1830-1837, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Victoria, 1837-1901, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Alexandra, 1901-1925, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Mary, 1910-1953, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth, Later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, 1937-2002, Mistress of The Robes To Queen Elizabeth II, 1953-present

Famous quotes containing the words mistress of the, robes and/or mistress:

    Let me see, what am I to buy for our sheep-shearing feast? Three pound of sugar, five pound of currants, rice—what will this sister of mine do with rice? But my father hath made her mistress of the feast, and she lays it on.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    In the learned journal, in the influential newspaper, I discern no form; only some irresponsible shadow; oftener some monied corporation, or some dangler, who hopes, in the mask and robes of his paragraph, to pass for somebody. But through every clause and part of speech of the right book I meet the eyes of the most determined men; his force and terror inundate every word: the commas and dashes are alive; so that the writing is athletic and nimble,—can go far and live long.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Trying to avoid
    Ideas, as in this poem? But we
    Go back to them as to a wife, leaving
    The mistress we desire?
    John Ashbery (b. 1927)