Mechanics - Classical Versus Quantum

Classical Versus Quantum

Classical mechanics
History of classical mechanics
Timeline of classical mechanics
Branches
  • Statics
  • Dynamics / Kinetics
  • Kinematics
  • Applied mechanics
  • Celestial mechanics
  • Continuum mechanics
  • Statistical mechanics
Formulations
  • Newtonian mechanics (Vectorial mechanics)
  • Analytical mechanics:
    • Lagrangian mechanics
    • Hamiltonian mechanics
Fundamental concepts
  • Space
  • Time
  • Mass
  • Inertia
  • Velocity
  • Speed
  • Acceleration
  • Force
  • Momentum
  • Impulse
  • Torque / Moment / Couple
  • Angular momentum
  • Moment of inertia
  • Reference frame
  • Energy
  • Kinetic energy
  • Potential energy
  • Mechanical work
  • Mechanical power
  • Virtual work
  • D'Alembert's principle
Core topics
  • Rigid body
  • Rigid body dynamics
  • Euler's equations (rigid body dynamics)
  • Motion
  • Linear motion
  • Newton's laws of motion
  • Newton's law of universal gravitation
  • Euler's laws of motion
  • Equations of motion
  • Inertial frame of reference
  • Non-inertial reference frame
  • Fictitious force
  • Mechanics of planar particle motion
  • Displacement (vector)
  • Relative velocity
  • Friction
  • Simple harmonic motion
  • Harmonic oscillator
  • Vibration
  • Damping
  • Damping ratio

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    Eric Gill (1882–1940)