List of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston

(1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance. Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

  • "Crazy for This Democracy" (1945)

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Other articles related to "zora neale hurston, hurston, zora":

Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... Every winter, Eatonville stages its annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ...
Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name! ... in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... On April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of ...

Famous quotes by zora neale hurston:

    When a Jamaican is born of a black woman and some English or Scotsman, the black mother is literally and figuratively kept out of sight as far as possible, but no one is allowed to forget that white father, however questionable the circumstances of birth.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    To me, bitterness is the under-arm odor of wishful weakness. It is the graceless acknowledgment of defeat.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    Trees and plants always look like the people they live with, somehow.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    I maintain that I have been a Negro three times—a Negro baby, a Negro girl and a Negro woman. Still, if you have received no clear cut impression of what the Negro in America is like, then you are in the same place with me. There is no The Negro here. Our lives are so diversified, internal attitudes so varied, appearances and capabilities so different, that there is no possible classification so catholic that it will cover us all, except My people! My people!
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    I do not weep at the world—I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)