Who is zora neale hurston?

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. Of Hurston's four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

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Some articles on zora neale hurston:

Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ... In addition to this, Hurston's novel Their Eyes Were Watching God presents a brief overview of the founding of the town through the eyes of Janie Crawford, the main character of the novel, and some suggest a cipher ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston
... (1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance ... Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God ...
Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name! ... to Brother, set in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... On April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of the American ...

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    The thing that struck me forcefully was the feeling of great age about the place. Standing on that old parade ground, which is now a cricket field, I could feel the dead generations crowding me. Here was the oldest settlement of freedmen in the Western world, no doubt. Men who had thrown off the bands of slavery by their own courage and ingenuity. The courage and daring of the Maroons strike like a purple beam across the history of Jamaica.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    God took pattern after a pine tree and built you noble.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    Anybody depending on somebody else’s gods is depending on a fox not to eat chickens.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    For four hundred years the blacks of Haiti had yearned for peace. for three hundred years the island was spoken of as a paradise of riches and pleasures, but that was in reference to the whites to whom the spirit of the land gave welcome. Haiti has meant split blood and tears for blacks.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    Every other evening around six o’clock he left home and dying dawn saw him hustling home around the lake where the challenging sun flung a flaming sword from east to west across the trembling water.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)