Who is zora neale hurston?

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. Of Hurston's four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

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Some articles on zora neale hurston:

Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name! ... Brother to Brother, set in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... On April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of the American Masters series ...
Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... Every winter, Eatonville stages its annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston
... (1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance ... Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God ...

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    It is one of the blessings of this world that few people see visions and dream dreams.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    God took pattern after a pine tree and built you noble.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    It seems that fighting is a game where everybody is the loser.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    But for the national welfare, it is urgent to realize that the minorities do think, and think about something other than the race problem.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    But now Miss America, World’s champion woman, you take your promenading self down into the cobalt blue waters of the Caribbean and see what happens. You meet a lot of darkish men who make vociferous love to you, but otherwise pay you no mid.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)