Who is zora neale hurston?

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. Of Hurston's four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

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Some articles on zora neale hurston:

Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... Every winter, Eatonville stages its annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ...
Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name! ... The 2004 film Brother to Brother, set in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... On April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of the American Masters series ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston
... (1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance ... Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God ...

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    There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    When a Jamaican is born of a black woman and some English or Scotsman, the black mother is literally and figuratively kept out of sight as far as possible, but no one is allowed to forget that white father, however questionable the circumstances of birth.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    So in Jamaica it is the aim of everybody to talk English, act English and look English. And that last specification is where the greatest difficulties arise. It is not so difficult to put a coat of European culture over African culture, but it is next to impossible to lay a European face over an African face in the same generation.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    These, his images and happenings of the mind, scrambled from his lips and entertained the listeners for a day, then went to join the thousands of other dreams where they dwelt.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    You can tell ‘em what Ah say if you wants to. Dat’s just de same as me ‘cause mah tongue is in mah friend’s mouf.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)