Who is zora neale hurston?

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. Of Hurston's four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

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Some articles on zora neale hurston:

Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... Every winter, Eatonville stages its annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ...
Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name!. 2004 film Brother to Brother, set in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of the American Masters series ...
List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston
... (1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance ... Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God ...

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    In the past, as now, Haiti’s curse has been her politicians. There are still too many men of influence in the country who believe that a national election is a mandate from the people to build themselves a big new house in Petionville and Kenscoff and a trip to Paris.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    I regret all of my books.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    Africa has her mouth on Moses.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    But I am not tragically colored. There is no great sorrow dammed up in my soul, nor lurking behind my eyes. I do not mind at all. I do not belong to the sobbing school of negrohood who hold that nature somehow has given them a lowdown dirty deal.... No, I do not weep at the world—I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1907–1960)

    He got a puzzlegut on ‘im and he so chuckle-headed, he got a pone behind his neck.
    —Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)