List of British Words Not Widely Used in The United States

This is a list of British words not widely used in the United States. In Canada and Australia, some of the British terms listed are used, although another usage is often preferred.

  • Words with specific British English meanings that have different meanings in American and/or additional meanings common to both languages (e.g. pants, cot) are to be found at List of words having different meanings in American and British English. When such words are herein used or referenced, they are marked with the flag (different meaning).
  • Asterisks (*) denote words and meanings having appreciable (that is, not occasional) currency in American, but nonetheless notable for their relatively greater frequency in British speech and writing.
  • British English spelling is consistently used throughout the article, except when explicitly referencing American terms.
Contents
  • A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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List Of British Words Not Widely Used In The United States - Z
... zed last letter of the alphabet, pronounced "zee" in United States zebra crossing (US crosswalk) Zimmer frame walker ...

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