Lick

Lick may refer to:

  • Licking, passing the tongue over a surface
  • Lick (stream), a small or ephemeral stream
  • Lick (music), a short phrase, or series of notes, often improvised by a musician
  • Lick (album), by The Lemonheads
  • "Lick" (song), by Joi
  • Lick (band), an American band, fl. 1990s
  • Salt lick, a salt deposit that animals regularly lick
  • Lick's Homeburgers, a Canadian restaurant chain

In things named after James Lick (see people, below):

  • Lick (crater), a crater on the Moon
  • 1951 Lick, an asteroid
  • Lick Observatory, an astronomical observatory in California, United States
See also All pages beginning with "James Lick"

Read more about Lick:  People

Other articles related to "lick":

Lick - People
... Dennis Lick (born 1954), American professional football lineman 1976–1981 Jacklyn Lick (born 1970), American pornographic actress James Lick (1796–1876), American carpenter ... American computer scientist, nicknamed "Lick" ...

Famous quotes containing the word lick:

    There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. And at his gate lay a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, who longed to satisfy his hunger with what fell from the rich man’s table; even the dogs would come and lick his sores. The poor man died and was carried away by the angels to be with Abraham.
    Bible: New Testament, Luke 16:19-22.

    Professor: War is hell, Mr. Thornhill, even if it’s just a cold one.
    Roger Thornhill: If you fellows can’t lick the Vandamms of this world without asking girls like her to bed down with them, and fly away with them, and probably never come back, perhaps you ought to start learning how to lose a few cold wars.
    Professor: I’m afraid we’re already doing that.
    Ernest Lehman (b.1920)

    Rich fellas come up and they die, and their kids ain’t no good, and they die out. But we keep a-comin’. We’re the people that live. They can’t wipe us out. They can’t lick us. And we’ll go on forever, Pa, ‘cause we’re the people.
    Nunnally Johnson (1897–1977)