Home Computer

Home Computer

Home computers were a class of microcomputers entering the market in 1977, and becoming common during the 1980s. They were marketed to consumers as affordable and accessible computers that, for the first time, were intended for the use of a single nontechnical user. These computers typically cost much less than business, scientific or engineering-oriented computers of the time, and were generally less powerful in terms of memory and expandability. However, a home computer often had better graphics and sound than contemporary business computers and, by far, their most common use was playing video games.

Advertisements for early home computers were rife with possibilities for their practical use in the home, from cataloging recipes to personal finance to home automation, but these were seldom realized in practice. For example, using a typical 1980s home computer as a home automation appliance would require the computer to be kept powered on at all times and dedicated to this task. Personal finance and database use required tedious data entry. If no packaged software was available for a particular application, the home computer user was required to learn computer programming; a significant time commitment many new computer owners weren't willing to make. Still, for others the home computer offered the first opportunity to learn to program.

Today the line between 'business' and 'home' computer market segments has blurred or vanished completely, since both categories of computers now typically use the same processor architectures, peripherals, operating systems, and applications. Often the only difference may be the sales outlet through which they are purchased. Another change from the home computer era is that the once-common endeavour of writing one's own software programs has almost vanished from home computer use.

Read more about Home ComputerBackground, Technology, Radio Frequency Interference, The Home Computer "Revolution", Use in The 21st Century, Notable Home Computers

Other articles related to "computers, computer, home computer":

Personal Computer - History
... Main article History of personal computers See also Microcomputer revolution The Z3 by German inventor Konrad Zuse from 1941 was the first working programmable, fully automatic computing ... Thus, Zuse is often regarded as the inventor of the computer ... The Programma 101, released in 1965, was the first commercial "desktop computer", but today it would usually be considered as a printing programmable calculator ...
Notable Home Computers - 1980s
... Am.), under US$300 first computer of any kind to pass one million sold. 1980 TRS-80 Color Computer (N. 1981 BBC Micro (Europe) (premier educational computer in the UK for a decade advanced BBC BASIC with integrated 6502 machine code assembler, featured a myriad of I/O ports, ~ 1.5 million sold ...
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... Computer animation can be created with a computer and animation software ... the rendering can take a lot of time on an ordinary home computer ... can be rendered in real time on a home computer ...
Compucolor II
... The CompuColor II was an early home computer introduced in 1977 by Intelligent Systems Corporation ... of the Compucolor, which is credited with being the first home computer system with built-in color graphics, designed to hit the home computer price points ... Unlike its predecessor, it was an "all-in-one" computer, meaning that mainboard, monitor and floppy disk drive were integrated into one case ...
History - Atari Inc. (1972–1984)
... Syzygy Engineering, that designed and built the first arcade video game - Computer Space for Nutting Associates ... The result was the Atari Video Computer System, or "VCS" (Later renamed the Atari 2600 when the Atari 5200 was released) ... Midway into the effort's time-frame, the home computer revolution was taking off, so the new machines were adapted, with the addition of a keyboard and various inputs, to produce ...

Famous quotes containing the words computer and/or home:

    The computer takes up where psychoanalysis left off. It takes the ideas of a decentered self and makes it more concrete by modeling mind as a multiprocessing machine.
    Sherry Turkle (b. 1948)

    Douglas. Now remains a sweet reversion—
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    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)