History of Solar System Formation and Evolution Hypotheses

History Of Solar System Formation And Evolution Hypotheses

Ideas concerning the origin and fate of the world date from the earliest known writings; however, for almost all of that time, there was no attempt to link such theories to the existence of a "Solar System", simply because almost no one knew or believed that the Solar System, in the sense we now understand it, existed. The first step towards a theory of Solar System formation was the general acceptance of heliocentrism, the model which placed the Sun at the centre of the system and the Earth in orbit around it. This conception had been gestating for thousands of years, but was only widely accepted by the end of the 17th century. The first recorded use of the term "Solar System" dates from 1704.

Read more about History Of Solar System Formation And Evolution Hypotheses:  Currently Accepted Hypotheses, Formation Hypotheses, Solar Evolution Hypotheses, Lunar Origins Hypotheses

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History Of Solar System Formation And Evolution Hypotheses - Lunar Origins Hypotheses - Other Natural Satellites
... of the Moon, they have been employed to explain the formation of other natural satellites in the Solar System ... believed to have formed via co-accretion, while the Solar System's irregular satellites, such as Triton, are all believed to have been captured ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, evolution, formation, hypotheses, solar, history and/or system:

    He wrote in prison, not a History of the World, like Raleigh, but an American book which I think will live longer than that. I do not know of such words, uttered under such circumstances, and so copiously withal, in Roman or English or any history.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

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    Kent Nerburn (20th century)

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