History of Books

The history of books follows a suite of technological innovations for books. These improved the quality of text conservation, the access to information, portability, and the cost of production. This history has been linked to political and economical contingencies, the history of ideas, and the history of religion.

Read more about History Of Books:  Origins and Antiquity, Clay Tablets, Papyrus, East Asia, Pre-columbian Codices of The Americas, Wax Tablets, Parchment, Paper, Middle Ages, Printing Press, Contemporary Era, Gallery, Academic Programs

Other articles related to "history of books, history of, book, books":

Bookish - History of Books - Modern World
... The centuries after the 15th century were thus spent on improving both the printing press and the conditions for freedom of the press through the gradual relaxation of restrictive censorship laws ... See also intellectual property, public domain, copyright ...
History Of Books - Selected Resources - Periodicals
... Annual bibliography of the history of the printed book and libraries ... Note "A quarterly journal from the low countries devoted to manuscripts and printed books." Revue fran├žaise d'histoire du livre ... Book History ...

Famous quotes containing the words history of, books and/or history:

    The second day of July 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more
    John Adams (1735–1826)

    Like dreaming, reading performs the prodigious task of carrying us off to other worlds. But reading is not dreaming because books, unlike dreams, are subject to our will: they envelop us in alternative realities only because we give them explicit permission to do so. Books are the dreams we would most like to have, and, like dreams, they have the power to change consciousness, turning sadness to laughter and anxious introspection to the relaxed contemplation of some other time and place.
    Victor Null, South African educator, psychologist. Lost in a Book: The Psychology of Reading for Pleasure, introduction, Yale University Press (1988)

    I am not a literary man.... I am a man of science, and I am interested in that branch of Anthropology which deals with the history of human speech.
    —J.A.H. (James Augustus Henry)