Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize

The Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize (complete German title "Förderpreis für deutsche Wissenschaftler im Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-Programm der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft") is a research prize awarded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German research foundation) every year since 1985 to scientists working in Germany. This highest German research prize consists of a research grant of 2.5 million euro, to be used within seven years. Every year, ten Leibniz prizes are awarded.

Prize winners include Dieter Lüst (2000), Gerd Faltings (1996), Peter Gruss (1994), Svante Pääbo (1992), Dieter Fenske (1992), Bert Hölldobler 1990), Theodor W. Hänsch (1989), Sigrid D. Peyerimhoff (1989), Jürgen Mittelstraß (1989), Günter Hotz (1989), Erwin Neher (1987), Bert Sakmann (1987), Dietrich Dörner (1986), Jürgen Habermas (1986), Hartmut Michel (1986), and Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard (1986).

Read more about Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990, 1989, 1988, 1987, 1986

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    Matthew Tindal (1653–1733)

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    —Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831)