Global Address List

The Global Address List (GAL) also known as Microsoft Exchange Global Address Book is a directory service within the Microsoft Exchange email system. The GAL contains information for all email users, distribution groups, and Exchange resources. Digital IDs certificates generated by Microsoft Exchange Server Advanced Security IIS or by Microsoft Exchange Key Management Server (KMS) are automatically published in the Global Address Book. Users of Microsoft Outlook can publish to GAL their externally generated PKI certificates that are used for secure e-mail.

Read more about Global Address List:  Updating The Global Address List

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Updating The Global Address List
... groups, it will take 24 hours before these modifications are reflected in the Global Address List ... be time consuming, especially if updating both the Global Address List and the Address List, a number of third party GUI applications are available to ...

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