Gastric Lavage - Technique

Technique

Gastric lavage involves the passage of a tube (such as an Ewald tube) via the mouth or nose down into the stomach followed by sequential administration and removal of small volumes of liquid. The placement of the tube in the stomach must be confirmed either by air insufflation while listening to the stomach, by pH testing a small amount of aspirated stomach contents, or x-ray. This is to ensure the tube is not in the lungs. In adults, small amounts of warm water or saline are administered and, via a siphoning action, removed again. In children, normal saline is used, as children are more at risk of developing hyponatremia if lavaged with water. Because of the possibility of vomiting, a suction device is always on hand in case of pulmonary aspiration of stomach contents. Lavage is repeated until the returning fluid shows no further gastric contents. If the patient is unconscious or cannot protect their airway then the patient should be intubated before performing lavage. The person must be put to sleep for a period of time during the operation due to its high risk of shock and hyponatremia.

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Other articles related to "technique, techniques":

Technique

Technique may also refer to:

  • The Techniques, a Jamaican rocksteady vocal group of the 1960s
  • The Technique, the school newspaper of the Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Technique, the yearbook of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Technique (album), a 1989 album by British rock group New Order
  • Technique (band), British female synth pop band in the 1990s
  • "Technique" (song), an instrumental song by Linkin Park on their Hybrid Theory EP
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Famous quotes containing the word technique:

    Every notable advance in technique or organization has to be paid for, and in most cases the debit is more or less equivalent to the credit. Except of course when it’s more than equivalent, as it has been with universal education, for example, or wireless, or these damned aeroplanes. In which case, of course, your progress is a step backwards and downwards.
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    Technique is the test of sincerity. If a thing isn’t worth getting the technique to say, it is of inferior value.
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    The audience is the most revered member of the theater. Without an audience there is no theater. Every technique learned by the actor, every curtain, every flat on the stage, every careful analysis by the director, every coordinated scene, is for the enjoyment of the audience. They are our guests, our evaluators, and the last spoke in the wheel which can then begin to roll. They make the performance meaningful.
    Viola Spolin (b. 1911)