Friends World Committee For Consultation

The Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC) is a Quaker organization that works to communicate between all parts of Quakerism. FWCC's world headquarters is based in London. It has Consultative NGO status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. FWCC shares responsibility for the Quaker UN Office in Geneva and New York with the American Friends Service Committee and Britain Yearly Meeting.

FWCC was set up at the 1937 Second World Conference of Friends in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, US,

"to act in a consultative capacity to promote better understanding among Friends the world over, particularly by the encouragement of joint conferences and intervisitation, the collection and circulation of information about Quaker literature and other activities directed towards that end."

Read more about Friends World Committee For Consultation:  Structure, World Office Staff (at June 2009), FWCC Triennials, Timeline

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