Formal Group Law

Some articles on formal group law, group laws, formal group laws:

Lubin–Tate Formal Group Laws
... The Lubin–Tate formal group law is the unique (1-dimensional) formal group law F such that e(x) = px + xp is an endomorphism of F, in other words More generally we can allow e to be any ... All the group laws for different choices of e satisfying these conditions are strictly isomorphic ... a in Zp there is a unique endomorphism f of the Lubin–Tate formal group law such that f(x) = ax + higher-degree terms ...
Elliptic Cohomology - Definitions and Constructions
... theories possess a complex orientation, which gives a formal group law ... A particularly rich source for formal group laws are elliptic curves ... A cohomology theory A with is called elliptic if it is even periodic and its formal group law is isomorphic to a formal group law of an elliptic curve E over R ...

Famous quotes containing the words law, formal and/or group:

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    Andrew Jackson (1767–1845)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

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