Ring

Ring may refer to:

  • Ring (jewellery), a decorative ornament worn on fingers, toes, or around the arm or neck

Read more about Ring:  Sounds, People, Places, Sports, Other Uses

Other articles related to "ring, rings":

Siegfried (opera)
... is the third of the four operas that constitute Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner ... on 16 August 1876, as part of the first complete performance of The Ring ...
Types of Electrical Connectors - Ring and Spade Terminals
... in the top row of the image are known as ring terminals and spade terminals (sometimes called split ring terminals) ... contact is made by the flat surface of the ring or spade, while mechanically they are attached by passing a screw or bolt through them ...
Ring - Other Uses
... Ring (diacritic), as in "Åmål" Brass ring Cock ring Piston ring Rings (local I.B.M ... clubs) Ring of bells Ring road, a type of highway ...
Pan (moon)
35 kilometres across and 23 km high that orbits within the Encke Gap in Saturn's A Ring ... Pan acts as a ring shepherd and is responsible for keeping the Encke Gap free of ring particles ...
NGC 7742
... The galaxy is unusual in that it contains a ring but no bar ... Typically, bars are needed to produce a ring structure ... move gas to the ends of the bars, where it forms into the rings seen in many barred spiral galaxies ...

Famous quotes containing the word ring:

    When the merry bells ring round,
    And the jocund rebecks sound
    To many a youth and many a maid,
    Dancing in the chequered shade;
    And young and old come forth to play
    On a sunshine holiday,
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    When I received this [coronation] ring I solemnly bound myself in marriage to the realm; and it will be quite sufficient for the memorial of my name and for my glory, if, when I die, an inscription be engraved on a marble tomb, saying, “Here lieth Elizabeth, which reigned a virgin, and died a virgin.”
    Elizabeth I (1533–1603)

    Tell me where is fancy bred,
    Or in the heart or in the head?
    How begot, how nourished?
    Reply, reply.
    It is engendered in the eyes,
    With gazing fed, and fancy dies
    In the cradle where it lies.
    Let us all ring fancy’s knell.
    I’ll begin it. Ding, dong, bell.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)