Flowers

Some articles on flowers, flower:

Howellia - Biology
... The plant produces two types of flowers ... Submerged cleistogamous flowers remain closed and self-pollinate, and flowers that bloom above the surface of the water open into white blossoms and may cross with other ...
Common Wood Sorrel
... It flowers for a few months during the spring, with small white flowers with pink streaks ... Red or violet flowers also occur rarely ... During the night or when it rains both flowers and leaves contract ...
Brugmansia
... Their large, fragrant flowers give them their common name of angel's trumpets, a name sometimes used for the closely related genus Datura ... Brugmansia are woody trees or shrubs, with pendulous, not erect, flowers, that have no spines on their fruit ... bushes with erect (not pendulous) flowers, and most have spines on their fruit ...
Disa (orchid)
... The flowers grow in racemes or solitary ... The lip is nonresupinate, so the flower appears upside down compared to most orchids ... The flowers consist essentially of the sepals ...
Hazel Dormouse - Plants of Value To Dormice
... Oaks supply insect and flower food the acorns are of little value ... Honeysuckle bark is their primary nesting material, and flowers and fruit are used for food ... Bramble flowers and fruits provide food over a long period ...

Famous quotes containing the word flowers:

    These are thy wonders, Lord of love,
    To make us see we are but flowers that glide.
    Which when we once can finde and prove,
    Thou hast a garden for us where to bide.
    George Herbert (1593–1633)

    For every nineteenth-century middle-class family that protected its wife and child within the family circle, there was an Irish or a German girl scrubbing floors in that home, a Welsh boy mining coal to keep the home-baked goodies warm, a black girl doing the family laundry, a black mother and child picking cotton to be made into clothes for the family, and a Jewish or an Italian daughter in a sweatshop making “ladies” dresses or artificial flowers for the family to purchase.
    Stephanie Coontz (20th century)

    The pallor of girl’s brows shall be their pall;
    Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
    And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.
    Wilfred Owen (1893–1918)