Feng Zikai Chinese Children's Picture Book Award

Feng Zikai Chinese Children's Picture Book Award

The Feng Zikai Chinese Children’s Picture Book Award is a biannual award aimed at promoting original, quality Chinese children’s books and recognising the efforts of authors, illustrators and publishers. The Award is named after one of China’s best-known illustrators, the late Feng Zikai.

The Award is sponsored by the Chen Yet-Sen Family Foundation, a Hong Kong based charitable institution, which supports childhood literacy projects. It will be handed out for the first time in July 2009 and, thereafter, every other year.

The Award is comparable to the Caldecott Medal, which honours the most distinguished American picture book for children published in the United States each year.

Read more about Feng Zikai Chinese Children's Picture Book AwardBackground, Prizes, External Links

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