Who is Laurence Sterne?

  • (noun): English writer (born in Ireland) (1713-1766).
    Synonyms: Sterne

Laurence Sterne

Laurence Sterne (24 November 1713 – 18 March 1768) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and an Anglican clergyman. He is best known for his novels The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; but he also published many sermons, wrote memoirs, and was involved in local politics. Sterne died in London after years of fighting consumption.

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Some articles on Laurence Sterne:

Sutton-on-the-Forest - Laurence Sterne
... Laurence Sterne was the vicar of this parish, but when the parsonage house was destroyed by fire, he moved to nearby Coxwold ...
Laurence Sterne - Bibliography
... The Florida Edition of Sterne's works is currently the leading scholarly edition – although the final volume (Sterne's letters) has yet to be published ... René Bosch, Labyrinth of Digressions Tristram Shandy as Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators (Amsterdam, 2007) W ... New York, 1911) Percy Fitzgerald, Life of Laurence Sterne (London, 1864 second edition, London, 1896) Paul Stapfer, Laurence Sterne, sa personne et ses ouvrages (second edition ...

Famous quotes containing the words laurence sterne, sterne and/or laurence:

    If the heart beguiles itself in its choice [of a wife], and imagination will give excellencies which are not the portion of flesh and blood:Mwhen the dream is over, and we awake in the morning, it matters little whether ‘tis Rachael or Leah,—be the object what it will, as it must be on the earthly side ... of perfection,—it will fall short of the work of fancy, whose existence is in the clouds.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    [My father] was serious;Mhe was all uniformity;Mhe was systematical, and, like all systematick reasoners, he would move both heaven and earth, and twist and torture every thing in nature to support his hypothesis.
    —Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    Lay me down beneaf de willers in de grass,
    Whah de branch’ll go a-singin’ as it pass.
    —Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872–1906)