English Pronunciation of Greek Letters

This table gives the common English pronunciation of Greek letters using the International Phonetic Alphabet (see Wikipedia:IPA for English.) It is the pronunciation of the ancient Greek names of the Greek letters using the English teaching pronunciation. Sometimes, especially in the sciences, the vowels will be pronounced closer to the Greek, for example /ˈpsiː/ instead of /ˈsaɪ/ for psi.

Greek Ancient Greek
name
English
name
English
pronunciation
Α α ἅλφα Alpha /ˈælfə/
Β β βῆτα Beta /ˈbiːtə/, US /ˈbeɪtə/
Γ γ γάμμα Gamma /ˈɡæmə/
Δ δ δέλτα Delta /ˈdɛltə/
Ε ε ἔψιλόν Epsilon /ˈɛpsɨlɒn/, UK also /ɛpˈsaɪlən/
Ζ ζ ζῆτα Zeta /ˈziːtə/, US /ˈzeɪtə/
Η η ῆτα Eta /ˈiːtə/, US /ˈeɪtə/
Θ θ θῆτα Theta /ˈθiːtə/, US /ˈθeɪtə/
Ι ι ἰῶτα Iota /aɪˈoʊtə/
Κ κ κάππα Kappa /ˈkæpə/
Λ λ λάμβδα Lambda /ˈlæmdə/
Μ μ μῦ Mu /ˈmjuː/, US less commonly /ˈmuː/
Ν ν νῦ Nu /ˈnjuː/, US /ˈnuː/
Ξ ξ ξεῖ Xi /ˈzaɪ/, /ˈksaɪ/
Ο ο ὄμικρόν Omicron /ˈɒmɨkrɒn/, traditional UK /oʊˈmaɪkrɒn/
Π π πεῖ Pi /ˈpaɪ/
Ρ ρ ῥῶ Rho /ˈroʊ/
Σ σ
ς (final)
σῖγμα Sigma /ˈsɪɡmə/
Τ τ ταῦ Tau /ˈtaʊ/, also /ˈtɔː/
Υ υ ὔψιλόν Upsilon /juːpˈsaɪlən/, /ˈʊpsɨlɒn/, UK also /ʌpˈsaɪlən/, US /ˈʌpsɨlɒn/
Φ φ φεῖ Phi /ˈfaɪ/
Χ χ χεῖ Chi /ˈkaɪ/
Ψ ψ ψεῖ Psi /ˈsaɪ/, /ˈpsaɪ/
Ω ω ὦμέγα Omega US /oʊˈmeɪɡə/, traditional UK /ˈoʊmɨɡə/

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