Dog - Gallery of Dogs in Art

Gallery of Dogs in Art

Ancient Greek black-figure pottery depicting the return of a hunter and his dog. Made in Athens between 550–530 BC, found in Rhodes.
Riders and dogs. Ancient Greek Attic black-figure hydria, ca. 510–500 BC, from Vulci. Louvre Museum, Paris.
William McElcheran's Cross Section-dogs Dundas (TTC) Toronto
Detail of The Imperial Prince and his dog Nero by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux 1865 Marble. Photographed at the Musée d'Orsay.
A woodcut illustration from The history of four-footed beasts and serpents by Edward Topsell, 1658

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Other articles related to "gallery of dogs in art, dog, dogs":

Digital Dog - Gallery of Dogs in Art
... Greek black-figure pottery depicting the return of a hunter and his dog ... Made in Athens between 550–530 BC, found in Rhodes Riders and dogs ... Louvre Museum, Paris William McElcheran's Cross Section-dogs Dundas (TTC) Toronto Detail of The Imperial Prince and his dog Nero by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux 1865 Marble ...

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