Dissident

A dissident, broadly defined, is a person who actively challenges an established doctrine, policy, or institution. When dissidents unite for a common cause they often effect a dissident movement.

The noun was first used in the political sense in 1940, with the rise of such totalitarian systems as the Soviet Union.

Read more about DissidentEastern Bloc Dissidents, Republican Dissidents in Ireland

Other articles related to "dissident":

Republican Dissidents in Ireland
... See also Dissident republican The term dissident has become the primary term to describe Irish republicans who politically continue to oppose Good Friday ... Irish republican dissident groups include the Irish Republican Socialist Party (founded in 1974 – its currently-inactive paramilitary wing is the Irish National Liberation Army ...
Leonid Plyushch - Dissident Activities
... Plyushch became a dissident by taking a public stance on political hot topics of the time ... Soviet troops invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968, Plyushch jointly signed with 16 other Soviet dissident a declaration of solidarity with the democratic movement in Czechoslovakia ...
Dissident (song) - Live Performances
... "Dissident" was first performed live at the band's May 13, 1993 concert in San Francisco, California at Slim's Café ... Live performances of "Dissident" can be found on the "Dissident" single, various official bootlegs, and the Live at the Gorge 05/06 box set ...
Dissident (disambiguation)
... Dissident may be Dissident - a person who actively opposes an established opinion, policy, or structure Dissident (song) - A Pearl Jam song ...

Famous quotes containing the word dissident:

    The dissident does not operate in the realm of genuine power at all. He is not seeking power. He has no desire for office and does not gather votes. He does not attempt to charm the public, he offers nothing and promises nothing. He can offer, if anything, only his own skin—and he offers it solely because he has no other way of affirming the truth he stands for. His actions simply articulate his dignity as a citizen, regardless of the cost.
    Václav Havel (b. 1936)

    The dissident does not operate in the realm of genuine power at all. He is not seeking power. He has no desire for office and does not gather votes. He does not attempt to charm the public, he offers nothing and promises nothing. He can offer, if anything, only his own skin—and he offers it solely because he has no other way of affirming the truth he stands for. His actions simply articulate his dignity as a citizen, regardless of the cost.
    Václav Havel (b. 1936)