Death of The Author

Death Of The Author

"The Death of the Author" is a 1967 essay by the French literary critic and theorist Roland Barthes. Barthes's essay argues against traditional literary criticism's practice of incorporating the intentions and biographical context of an author in an interpretation of a text, and instead argues that writing and creator are unrelated.

The essay's first English-language publication was in the American journal Aspen, no. 5-6 in 1967; the French debut was in the magazine Manteia, no. 5 (1968). The essay later appeared in an anthology of Barthes's essays, Image-Music-Text (1977), a book that also included his "From Work To Text".

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Death Of The Author - Influences and Overview
... A post-structuralist text, "Death of the Author" influenced French continental philosophy, particularly that of Jacques Derrida ... Ideas presented in "The Death of the Author" were anticipated to some extent by the New Criticism, a school of literary criticism important in the United States from the ... Fallacy" declares that a poem does not belong to its author rather, "it is detached from the author at birth and goes about the world beyond his power to intend about it or control it ...

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