Who is Percy Bysshe Shelley?

  • (noun): Englishman and Romantic poet (1792-1822).
    Synonyms: Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (/ˈpɜrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/; 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is critically regarded as among the finest lyric poets in the English language. A radical in his poetry as well as his political and social views, Shelley did not achieve fame during his lifetime, but recognition for his poetry grew steadily following his death. Shelley was a key member of a close circle of visionary poets and writers that included Lord Byron; Leigh Hunt; Thomas Love Peacock; and his own second wife, Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein.

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Some articles on Percy Bysshe Shelley:

List Of Works By Mary Shelley - Edited Works
... Shelley, Percy Bysshe ... Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley ... Shelley, Percy Bysshe ...
Fanny Imlay
... Percy Bysshe Shelley Frances "Fanny" Imlay (14 May 1794 – 9 October 1816), also known as Fanny Godwin and Frances Wollstonecraft, was the illegitimate ... Fanny's mother wrote about her frequently in her later works, and Percy Bysshe Shelley composed a poem on her death ... and her half-sister Mary later wrote Frankenstein and married Shelley, a leading Romantic poet ...
Daniel Steven Crafts - List of Works - For Solo Voice
... Verses to a Cat (Percy Bysshe Shelley) The Owl the Pussycat (Edward Lear) On the Death of a Cat (Christina Rossetti) Cat Stretching Elegy to a Favourite Cat (Thomas ... Setting of a poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley for voice and piano ... Setting of a poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley for male voice and piano ...
List Of Biographers - Articles About Lives of Notable Authors Writing or Have Written About Lives of Other Notable (or Not
... Medici Jean Overton Fuller (1915–2009) - Noor-un-nisa Inayat Khan, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Algernon Charles Swinburne, Sir Francis Bacon Elizabeth Gaskell (1810–1865) - Charlotte Brontë Peter. 1961) - Bronson Alcott, Louisa May Alcott, Margaret Fuller André Maurois (1885–1967) - Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, Benjamin Disraeli, Victor Hugo, Balzac ... Leo Tolstoy, and Gandhi Henry Salt, (1851–1939) - English authority on Shelley, Richard Jefferies, and Henry David Thoreau Carl Sandburg (1878–1967 ...
Epic Poetry - Notable Epic Poems - Modern Epics (from 1500)
... Southey (1810) Rokeby and The Bridal of Triermain by Walter Scott (1813) Queen Mab (poem) by Percy Bysshe Shelley (1813) Roderick the Last of the Goths by Robert Southey (1814) The Lord of the ...

Famous quotes containing the words percy bysshe shelley, percy bysshe, bysshe shelley, shelley and/or bysshe:

    My own, my human mind, which passively
    Now renders and receives fast influencings,
    Holding an unremitting interchange
    With the clear universe of things around;
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    The beauty of the internal nature cannot be so far concealed by its accidental vesture, but that the spirit of its form shall communicate itself to the very disguise and indicate the shape it hides from the manner in which it is worn. A majestic form and graceful motions will express themselves through the most barbarous and tasteless costume.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    The dust of creeds outworn.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being,
    Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
    Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing,
    Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red,
    Pestilence-stricken multitudes.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    That land is like an Eagle, whose young gaze
    Feeds on the noontide beam, whose golden plume
    Floats moveless on the storm, and in the blaze
    Of sunrise gleams when Earth is wrapped in gloom;
    An epitaph of glory for the tomb
    Of murdered Europe may thy fame be made,
    Great People! as the sands shalt thou become;
    Thy growth is swift as morn, when night must fade;
    The multitudinous Earth shall sleep beneath thy shade.
    —Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)