Culture of Florida

The culture of Florida is similar to the rest of United States of America culture, but as a coastal state, Florida culture has been influenced by immigrant populations, especially those from Latin America and Europe. Florida is a melting pot as well as an international crossroad to the United States.

As one of the Southern states, Florida has long been influenced by Southern culture. Some Southern culture remains partly prominent in the state, particularly in the Panhandle, North Central Florida, the First Coast, northern Central Florida and the Florida Heartland. More recently the state has been influenced by the cultures of people moving in from foreign countries and other parts of the United States. Florida culture is also influenced by its economy, most notably from the effects of tourism, a highly important industry in the state.

Also, as one of the New Spain states, it shares history, culture, food and other things with the Spanish, especially Cuban and Puerto Rican.

Read more about Culture Of Florida:  Cuisine, Economic Trends, Languages, Music, Religion, Sports and Recreation

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Culture Of Florida - Sports and Recreation
... Sports in Florida include professional teams in all major sports, Olympic Games contenders and medalists, collegiate teams in major and small-school conferences ... Florida also has an abundance of outdoor recreational activities as well ...

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