Cultural Revolution Group

The Cultural Revolution Group (CRG) (Chinese: 中央文革小组) was formed in May 1966 as a replacement organisation to the Central Committee Secretariat and the "Five Man Group", and was initially directly responsible to the Standing Committee of the Politburo. It consisted mainly of radical supporters of Mao, including Chen Boda, the Chairman's wife Jiang Qing, Kang Sheng, Yao Wenyuan, Zhang Chunqiao, Wang Li and Xie Fuzhi. The CRG had a central role to play in the Cultural Revolution's first few years, and for a period of time the group replaced the Politburo Standing Committee (PSC) as the de facto top power organ of China. Its members were also involved in many of the major events of the Cultural Revolution.

Read more about Cultural Revolution Group:  Background, Role in The Cultural Revolution, Fall of The Cultural Revolution Group

Other articles related to "cultural revolution group, cultural revolution, groups, group, revolutions, revolution":

Fall of The Cultural Revolution Group
... The first two years of the Cultural Revolution witnessed a continued growth in tensions between the People's Liberation Army and the CRG, due to the PLA's gradual suppression of the CRG-backed rebel groups and Red ... In November 1967, the Group's radical party journal, Red Flag, was ordered to stop publication ... of 1967, when armed conflict between rebel groups, other groups and the PLA had been the norm ...
Revolution - Etymology
... of planets around the sun De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of Celestial Bodies) and this has come to be the model type of a scientific revolution ... However, “revolution” is attested by at least 1450 in the sense of representing abrupt change in a social order ... The process was termed "The Glorious Revolution" ...
Central Case Examination Group - Role in The Cultural Revolution
... Unlike its counterpart the Cultural Revolution Group, the CCEG was to operate throughout the entire of the Cultural Revolution decade and beyond, investigating and reporting on the crimes of ... The group's highest profile case was that of Liu Shaoqi, whose case was reportedly investigated by 400,000 people (including some Red Guards from Peking University), looking at over four million files ... The CCEG's membership included most of the membership of the Cultural Revolution Group and Zhou Enlai, with Mao Zedong's wife Jiang Qing taking a particularly ...
Revolution (song) - Promotional Clips
... Filming for promotional clips of "Hey Jude" and "Revolution" took place on 4 September 1968 under the direction of Michael Lindsay-Hogg ... Two finished clips of "Revolution" were produced, with only lighting differences and other minor variations ... Their vocals included elements from "Revolution 1" McCartney and Harrison sang the "shoo-bee-doo-wah" backing vocals, and Lennon sang "count me out, in" ...
Revolution (song)
... "Revolution" is a song by The Beatles written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney ... as the B-side of the single "Hey Jude", and a slower version titled "Revolution 1" on the eponymous album The Beatles (commonly called the "White Album") ... Although "Revolution" was released first, it was recorded several weeks after "Revolution 1" as a re-make specifically designed to be released as a single ...

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