Revolution

A revolution (from the Latin revolutio, "a turn around") is a fundamental change in power or organizational structures that takes place in a relatively short period of time. Aristotle described two types of political revolution:

  1. Complete change from one constitution to another
  2. Modification of an existing constitution.

Revolutions have occurred through human history and vary widely in terms of methods, duration, and motivating ideology. Their results include major changes in culture, economy, and socio-political institutions.

Scholarly debates about what does and does not constitute a revolution center around several issues. Early studies of revolutions primarily analyzed events in European history from a psychological perspective, but more modern examinations include global events and incorporate perspectives from several social sciences, including sociology and political science. Several generations of scholarly thought on revolutions have generated many competing theories and contributed much to the current understanding of this complex phenomenon.

Read more about Revolution:  Types, Political and Socioeconomic Revolutions, Etymology

Other articles related to "revolution, revolutions":

Riyoko Ikeda - Biography
... of which are based on historical events, such as the French Revolution or the Russian Revolution ... This manga, loosely based on the French Revolution, has been made into several Takarazuka musicals and into an anime series and a live-action film ...
Revolution (song)
... "Revolution" is a song by The Beatles written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney ... rock version as the B-side of the single "Hey Jude", and a slower version titled "Revolution 1" on the eponymous album The Beatles (commonly called the "White Album") ... Although "Revolution" was released first, it was recorded several weeks after "Revolution 1" as a re-make specifically designed to be released as a single ...
Revolution (song) - Use in Nike Advertisement
... In 1987, "Revolution" became the first Beatles recording to be licensed for use in a television commercial ... Capitol-EMI said the lawsuit was groundless because they had licensed the use of "Revolution" with the "active support and encouragement of Yoko Ono Lennon, a shareholder ... The "Revolution" lawsuit and others involving The Beatles and EMI were settled out of court in November 1989, with the terms kept secret ...
Revolution (song) - Promotional Clips
... Filming for promotional clips of "Hey Jude" and "Revolution" took place on 4 September 1968 under the direction of Michael Lindsay-Hogg ... Two finished clips of "Revolution" were produced, with only lighting differences and other minor variations ... Their vocals included elements from "Revolution 1" McCartney and Harrison sang the "shoo-bee-doo-wah" backing vocals, and Lennon sang "count me out, in" ...
Revolution - Etymology
... around the sun De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of Celestial Bodies) and this has come to be the model type of a scientific revolution ... However, “revolution” is attested by at least 1450 in the sense of representing abrupt change in a social order ... The process was termed "The Glorious Revolution" ...

Famous quotes containing the word revolution:

    I have seen in this revolution a circular motion of the sovereign power through two usurpers, father and son, to the late King to this his son. For ... it moved from King Charles I to the Long Parliament; from thence to the Rump; from the Rump to Oliver Cromwell; and then back again from Richard Cromwell to the Rump; then to the Long Parliament; and thence to King Charles, where long may it remain.
    Thomas Hobbes (1579–1688)

    It is easier to run a revolution than a government.
    Ferdinand E. Marcos (1917–1981)

    But a cultivated man becomes ashamed of his property, out of new respect for his nature. Especially he hates what he has if he see that it is accidental,—came to him by inheritance, or gift, or crime; then he feels that it is not having; it does not belong to him, has no root in him and merely lies there because no revolution or no robber takes it away.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)