Count

Count (male) or Countess (female) is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility. The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning "companion", and later "companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor". The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl (whose wife is a "countess", for lack of an English term). Alternative names for the "Count" rank in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as Graf in Germany and Hakushaku during the Japanese Imperial era.

Read more about Count:  Definition, Comital Titles in Different European Languages, Equivalents

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... Aristocracy Raymond I, Count of Toulouse (died 865) Raymond II, Count of Toulouse (died 924) Raymond III, Count of Toulouse (died 978) Raymond IV, Count of Toulouse (c. 1041 or 1042–1105) Raymond V, Count of Toulouse (1134–1198) Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse (1156–1222) Raymond VII, Count of Toulouse (1197–1249) Raymond II of Tripoli (c. 1115–1152), Count of Tripoli from 1137 to 1152 Raymond III of Tripoli (c ...

Famous quotes containing the word count:

    The Count is neither sad, nor sick, nor merry, nor well; but civil count, civil as an orange, and something of that jealous complexion.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    I count those feathered balls of soot
    The moor-hen guides upon the stream,
    To silence the envy in my thought;
    And turn towards my chamber, caught
    In the cold snows of a dream.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    Do not count on much from the future, nor trouble your mind about the past.
    Chinese proverb.