Council of Arab Economic Unity

The Council of Arab Economic Unity (CAEU) was established by Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Mauritania, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, Syria, United Arab Emirates and Yemen on 3 June 1957. It became effective 30 May 1964, with the ultimate goal of achieving complete economic unity among its member states.

Read more about Council Of Arab Economic UnityObjectives, Agadir Agreement, Greater Arab Free Trade Area

Other articles related to "council of arab economic unity, arab, economic, council":

Council Of Arab Economic Unity - Greater Arab Free Trade Area
... The Greater Arab Free Trade Area (GAFTA) is a pan-Arab free trade area that came into existence in 1997 ... Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates) ... GAFTA followed the adoption of the Agreement to Facilitate and Develop Trade Among Arab Countries (1981) by the Arab League's Economic and Social Council (ESC) and the approval by 17 Arab ...

Famous quotes containing the words council of, unity, economic, arab and/or council:

    There by some wrinkled stones round a leafless tree
    With beards askew, their eyes dull and wild
    Twelve ragged men, the council of charity
    Wandering the face of the earth a fatherless child....
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    Authority is the spiritual dimension of power because it depends upon faith in a system of meaning that decrees the necessity of the hierarchical order and so provides for the unity of imperative control.
    Shoshana Zuboff (b. 1951)

    Politics at all times lead to bloody wars, and not only politics, but also religions as well as social and economic systems of all times are spattered with blood. Invariably the big ones devoured the little ones, and the little ones the tiny ones.
    Friedrich Dürrenmatt (1921–1990)

    As the Arab proverb says, “The dog barks and the caravan passes”. After having dropped this quotation, Mr. Norpois stopped to judge the effect it had on us. It was great; the proverb was known to us: it had been replaced that year among men of high worth by this other: “Whoever sows the wind reaps the storm”, which had needed some rest since it was not as indefatigable and hardy as, “Working for the King of Prussia”.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)

    I haven’t seen so much tippy-toeing around since the last time I went to the ballet. When members of the arts community were asked this week about one of their biggest benefactors, Philip Morris, and its requests that they lobby the New York City Council on the company’s behalf, the pas de deux of self- justification was so painstakingly choreographed that it constituted a performance all by itself.
    Anna Quindlen (b. 1952)