Clothing - Origin of Clothing

Origin of Clothing

See also: Evolution of hair

There is no easy way to determine when clothing was first developed, but some information has been inferred by studying lice. The body louse specifically lives in clothing, and diverge from head lice about 107,000 years ago, suggesting that clothing existed at that time. Another theory is that modern humans are the only survivors of several species of primates who may have worn clothes and that clothing may have been used as long ago as 650 thousand years ago. Other louse-based estimates put the introduction of clothing at around 42,000-72,000 BP.

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Other articles related to "origin of clothing, clothing":

Wearable - Origin of Clothing
... See also Evolution of hair There is no easy way to determine when clothing was first developed, but some information has been inferred by studying lice ... The body louse specifically lives in clothing, and diverge from head lice about 107,000 years ago, suggesting that clothing existed at that time ... survivors of several species of primates who may have worn clothes and that clothing may have been used as long ago as 650 thousand years ago ...

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