Term

Term may refer to:

  • Term (language) or terminology, a noun or compound word used in a specific context: meaning
  • Term (computers) or terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal
  • Term (architecture) or terminal form, a human head and bust that continues as a square tapering pillar-like form
  • Technical term, part of the specialized vocabulary of a particular field
  • Scientific terminology, terms used by scientists
  • Contractual term, a legally binding provision

Lengths of time:

  • Academic term, a division of the academic year in which classes are held
  • Easter term
  • Lent term
  • Michaelmas term
  • Term of office, the length of time a person serves in a particular office
  • Term of patent, the maximum period during which a patent can be maintained in force

In mathematics:

  • Term (mathematics), a component of a mathematical expression
  • Term (logic), a component of a logical expression
    • Ground term, a term with no variables
    • Term algebra, the algebra of mathematical terms
  • Term symbol, a concept in quantum mechanics

Other articles related to "term, terms":

Slashdot Effect - Terminology
... According to the Jargon File, the term "Slashdot effect" refers to phenomenon of a website becoming virtually unreachable because too many people are hitting it after the site was mentioned in an interesting ... on a popular site, similar to the more generic term, flash crowd, which is a more appropriate term ... The term "flash crowd" was coined in 1973 by Larry Niven in his science fiction short story, Flash Crowd ...
Civilization
... Civilization (or civilisation) is a sometimes controversial term that has been used in several related ways ... Primarily, the term has been used to refer to the material and instrumental side of human cultures that are complex in terms of technology, science, and division of labor ... There is a tendency to use the term in a less strict way, to mean approximately the same thing as "culture" and therefore, the term can more broadly refer ...
Multimedia - Terminology - History of The Term
... The term multimedia was coined by singer and artist Bob Goldstein (later 'Bobb Goldsteinn') to promote the July 1966 opening of his "LightWorks at L'Oursin" show ... music-cum-visuals to debut as discothèque fare.” Two years later, in 1968, the term "multimedia" was re-appropriated to describe the work of a political consultant, David Sawyer, the husband of ... In the late 1970s, the term referred to presentations consisting of multi-projector slide shows timed to an audio track ...
Nymph - Modern Sexual Connotations
... with men or women at their own volition, and are completely outside male control, the term is often used for women who are perceived as behaving similarly ... by Erle Stanley Gardner is derived from this meaning of the word.) The term nymphomania was created by modern psychology as referring to a "desire to engage in human sexual behavior at a level high enough to be ... Due to widespread use of the term among lay persons (often shortened to nympho) and stereotypes attached, professionals nowadays prefer the term hypersexuality, which can refer to males and ...
Vice-Chancellor Of Germany - History
... been widely known as Vizekanzler, this has never been the official term ... The official term since 1949 is Stellvertreter des Bundeskanzlers (Deputy to the Chancellor), however this term is seldom used outside very formal contexts ...

Famous quotes containing the word term:

    No—is a term very frequently employed by the fair, when they mean everything else but a negative. Their yes is always yes; but their no is not always no.
    Anonymous, U.S. women’s magazine contributor. M, Weekly Visitor or Ladies Miscellany, p. 203 (April 1803)

    Frankly, I do not like the idea of conversations to define the term “unconditional surrender.” ... The German people can have dinned into their ears what I said in my Christmas Eve speech—in effect, that we have no thought of destroying the German people and that we want them to live through the generations like other European peoples on condition, of course, that they get rid of their present philosophy of conquest.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    There are other letters for the child to learn than those which Cadmus invented. The Spaniards have a good term to express this wild and dusky knolwedge, Grammatica parda, tawny grammar, a kind of mother-wit derived from that same leopard to which I have referred.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)