Classical Revival Architecture

Classical Revival Architecture

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century, manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulas as an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. In its purest form it is a style principally derived from the architecture of Classical Greece and Rome and the architecture of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio. In form, Neoclassical architecture emphasizes the wall rather than chiaroscuro and maintains separate identities to each of its parts.

Read more about Classical Revival ArchitectureOrigins, Characteristics, Interior Design, City Planning, Late Phase, Neoclassicism Today

Other articles related to "classical revival architecture, architecture":

Classical Revival Architecture - Neoclassicism Today
... This rebirth is maily due to postmodern architecture, whose decorative tastes includes columns, capitals and tympana ... In particular, neo-eclectic architecture and neo historicist architecture are Postmodernism outgrowth that deals with an increasing demand in ... Terry's Maitland Robinson Library at Downing College and ADAM Architecture's Sackler Library illustrate that the approach taken can range from the traditional, in the former case ...

Famous quotes containing the words architecture, classical and/or revival:

    No architecture is so haughty as that which is simple.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)

    Culture is a sham if it is only a sort of Gothic front put on an iron building—like Tower Bridge—or a classical front put on a steel frame—like the Daily Telegraph building in Fleet Street. Culture, if it is to be a real thing and a holy thing, must be the product of what we actually do for a living—not something added, like sugar on a pill.
    Eric Gill (1882–1940)

    Mother goddesses are just as silly a notion as father gods. If a revival of the myths of these cults gives woman emotional satisfaction, it does so at the price of obscuring the real conditions of life. This is why they were invented in the first place.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)