Classical Revival Architecture

Classical Revival Architecture

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century, manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulas as an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. In its purest form it is a style principally derived from the architecture of Classical Greece and Rome and the architecture of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio. In form, Neoclassical architecture emphasizes the wall rather than chiaroscuro and maintains separate identities to each of its parts.

Read more about Classical Revival ArchitectureOrigins, Characteristics, Interior Design, City Planning, Late Phase, Neoclassicism Today

Other articles related to "classical revival architecture, architecture, classical":

Classical Revival Architecture - Neoclassicism Today
... This rebirth is maily due to postmodern architecture, whose decorative tastes includes columns, capitals and tympana ... In particular, neo-eclectic architecture and neo historicist architecture are Postmodernism outgrowth that deals with an increasing demand in contemporary classical architecture ... Maitland Robinson Library at Downing College and ADAM Architecture's Sackler Library illustrate that the approach taken can range from the traditional, in the former case, to the unconventional, in the ...

Famous quotes containing the words architecture, classical and/or revival:

    Polarized light showed the secret architecture of bodies; and when the second-sight of the mind is opened, now one color or form or gesture, and now another, has a pungency, as if a more interior ray had been emitted, disclosing its deep holdings in the frame of things.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Et in Arcadia ego.
    [I too am in Arcadia.]
    Anonymous, Anonymous.

    Tomb inscription, appearing in classical paintings by Guercino and Poussin, among others. The words probably mean that even the most ideal earthly lives are mortal. Arcadia, a mountainous region in the central Peloponnese, Greece, was the rustic abode of Pan, depicted in literature and art as a land of innocence and ease, and was the title of Sir Philip Sidney’s pastoral romance (1590)

    I do not think a revival of business will be greatly postponed by [Samuel J.] Tilden’s election. Business prosperity does not, in my judgment, depend on government so much as men commonly think.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)