Civil War Era in Norway - List of Kings and Pretenders During The Civil War Era

List of Kings and Pretenders During The Civil War Era

Pretenders who had themselves named king, but are not counted in the official line of kings are written in italics.

  • Magnus the Blind (1130–1135) (-1139)
  • Harald Gille (1130–1136)
    • Sigurd Slembe: 1135-1139
  • Sigurd Munn (1136–1155)
  • Inge Crouchback (1136–1161)
  • Øystein Haraldsson (1142–1157)
  • Håkon the Broadshouldered (1157–1162)
  • Magnus Erlingsson (1161–1184)
    • Sigurd Markusfostre: 1162-1163
    • Olav Ugjæva: 1166-1169
    • Eystein Meyla: 1174-1177
  • Sverre Sigurdsson (1177–1202)
    • Jon Kuvlung: 1185-1188
    • Sigurd Magnusson: 1193-1194
    • Inge Magnusson: 1196-1202
  • Håkon Sverresson (1202–1204)
  • Guttorm Sigurdsson (1204)
  • Inge Bårdsson (1204–1217)
    • Erling Stonewall: 1204-1207
    • Filippus Simonsson: 1207-1217
  • Håkon Håkonsson (1217–1263)
    • Sigurd Ribbung: 1220-1226
    • Knut Håkonsson: 1226-1227
    • Skule Bårdsson: 1239-1240

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