Civil War Era in Norway

Civil War Era In Norway

The Civil war era of Norwegian history (Norwegian borgerkrigstida) is a term used for the period in the history of Norway between 1130 and 1240. During this time, a series of civil wars were fought between rival kings and pretenders to the throne of Norway. The reasons for the wars is one of the most debated topics in Norwegian medieval history. The goal of the warring parties was always to put their man on the throne, starting with the death of King Sigurd the Crusader in 1130. In the first decades of the civil wars, alliances were shifting, and centered around the person of a king or pretender, but eventually, towards the end of the 12th century, two rival parties emerged, known as the Birkebeiner and the Bagler. After these two parties were reconciled in 1217, a more ordered system of government centered around the king was gradually able to bring an end to the frequent risings. The failed rising of duke Skule BĂ„rdsson in 1240 was the final event of the civil war era.

Read more about Civil War Era In Norway:  Sources To The Civil War Era, List of Kings and Pretenders During The Civil War Era

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    At Hayes’ General Store, west of the cemetery, hangs an old army rifle, used by a discouraged Civil War veteran to end his earthly troubles. The grocer took the rifle as payment ‘on account.’
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    Such was the very armor he had on
    When he the ambitious Norway combated.
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