Charlie Chan

Charlie Chan is a fictional Chinese-American detective created by Earl Derr Biggers. Loosely based on Honolulu detective Chang Apana, Biggers conceived of the benevolent and heroic Chan as an alternative to Yellow Peril stereotypes, such as villains like Fu Manchu. Chan is a detective for the Honolulu police, though many stories feature Chan traveling the world as he investigates mysteries and solves crimes.

Chan first appeared in Biggers' novels, but went on to be featured in a number of media. Over four dozen films featuring Charlie Chan have been made, beginning in 1926. The character was at first portrayed by Asian actors, and the films met with little success. In 1931, the Fox Film Corporation cast Swedish actor Warner Oland as Chan in Charlie Chan Carries On; the film was a success, and Fox went on to produce 15 more Chan films with Oland in the title role. After Oland's death, American actor Sidney Toler was cast as Chan; Toler made 22 Chan films, first for Fox and then for Monogram Studios. After Toler's death, six more films were made, starring Roland Winters.

In addition, a number of Spanish- and Chinese-language Chan films were made during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s. American-made Chan films were shown in China to much success, where the character was popular and respected. More recent film adaptations in the 1990s have been unsuccessful. The character has also been featured in several radio programs, two television shows, and a number of comics.

Interpretations of Chan by critics are split, especially as relates to his ethnicity. Positive assessors of Chan argue that he is portrayed as intelligent, benevolent and honorable — in contrast to the adverse depictions of evil or conniving Chinese then current on page and screen. Others state that Chan, despite his good qualities, reinforces certain Asian stereotypes, such as an alleged incapacity to speak fluent English and the possession of an overly tradition-bound and subservient nature.

Read more about Charlie ChanBooks, Comics and Games, Modern Interpretations and Criticism, Bibliography, Filmography

Other articles related to "charlie chan, chan, charlie":

Charlie Chan - Filmography
... Mitchell's A Guide to Charlie Chan Films (1999) ... Park Irving Cummings 1929 Charlie Chan Carries On Warner Oland Hamilton MacFadden 1931 Lost film Eran Trece (in Spanish) Manuel Arbó David Howard (uncredited) 1931 The Black Camel Warner Oland ... Charlie Chan at the Circus Warner Oland Harry Lachman 1936 Charlie Chan at the Race Track Warner Oland H ...
Charlie Chan At The Opera
... Charlie Chan at the Opera is considered by many to be the best Warner Oland Charlie Chan film, probably due to the co-acting of Boris Karloff ... This is the 13th film starring Oland as Chan and produced by Fox in 1936 ...
List Of Films: C - C - Ch - Cha-Che
1931) Champagne (1928) Champagne for Caesar (1950) Champion (1949) (2002) Chan Is Missing (1982) Chance (2002) The Chancellor Manuscript (2008) Chances Are (1989) Chandni Bar (2001 ... Cloud (2010) Charlie Wilson's War (2007) Charlie's Angels (2000) Charlie's Angels Full Throttle (2003) Charlie, the Lonesome Cougar (1967) Charlotte et son Jules (1960) Charlotte Gray (2001) Charlotte ...
List Of Thriller Films Of The 1930s
... Paton 1930 The Bat Whispers Roland West Spencer Charters, Chester Morris, Una Merkel 1931 Charlie Chan Carries On Hamilton MacFadden Warner Oland, John Garrick, Marguerite Churchill ... Archainbaud Irene Dunne, Myrna Loy, Ricardo Cortez 1933 Charlie Chan's Greatest Case Hamilton MacFadden Warner Oland, Heather Angel, Roger Imhof Crime ...
List Of Fox Films Before 1940 - 1930s
... March 29, 1931 A Connecticut Yankee April 6, 1931 Charlie Chan Carries On April 12, 1931 Three Girls Lost April 19, 1931 The Spy April 26, 1931 Quick Millions May 3 ... Sailors June 29, 1934 Baby Take a Bow June 30, 1934 Charlie Chan's Courage July 6, 1934 Call It Luck July 10, 1934 Grand Canary July 20, 1934 Handy Andy July 27, 1934 The Cat's-Paw August 7, 1934 Springtime for ...

Famous quotes related to charlie chan:

    Don’t pay any attention to Ah Ling. He has a mania for quoting Confucius. And Charlie Chan.
    —Joseph O’Donnell. Clifford Sanforth. Mrs. Houghland, Murder by Television, reassuring her friends after the houseboy has pointed out a sign of ill omen (1935)