C0 and C1 Control Codes

C0 And C1 Control Codes

Most character encodings, in addition to representing printable characters, may also represent additional information about the text, such as the position of a cursor, an instruction to start a new line, or a message that the text has been received. The C0 and C1 control code or control characters sets define control codes for use in text by computer systems that use the ISO/IEC 2022 system of specifying control and graphic characters. The C0 set defines codes in the range 00HEX–1FHEX and the C1 set defines codes in the range 80HEX–9FHEX. The default C0 set was originally defined in ISO 646 (ASCII), while the default C1 set was originally defined in ECMA-48 (harmonized later with ISO 6429). While other C0 and C1 sets are available for specialized applications, they are rarely used.

Read more about C0 And C1 Control CodesEncoding Interoperability, Protocols Interoperability and Usage, C0 (ASCII and Derivatives), C1 Set

Other articles related to "c0 and c1 control codes, control codes, c1, control":

set" class="article_title_2">C0 And C1 Control Codes - C1 Set
... These are the most common extended control codes ... If using the ISO/IEC 2022 extension mechanism, they are designated as the active C1 control character set with the sequence 0x1B 0x22 0x43 (ESC " C) ... Individual control functions can be accessed with the 7-bit equivalents 0x1B 0x40 through 0x1B 0x5F (ESC @ through ESC _) ...

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