British Counter-intelligence Against The Indian Revolutionary Movement During World War I

British counter-intelligence against the Indian revolutionary movement during World War I began from its initial roots in the late-19th century and ultimately came to span in extent from Asia through Europe to the West Coast of the United States and Canada. It was effective in thwarting a number of attempts for insurrection in British India during World War I and ultimately in controlling the Indian revolutionary movement both at home and abroad.

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British Counter-intelligence Against The Indian Revolutionary Movement During World War I - Impact
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