Australian Army Artillery Units, World War I

Australian Army Artillery Units, World War I

1st Division Artillery Formed August 1914 and assigned to 1st Division.

Subunits:

  • 1st Division Ammunition Column August 1914 - past November 1918
  • 1st Field Artillery Brigade August 1914 - past November 1918
  • 2nd Field Artillery Brigade August 1914 - past November 1918
    • 4th Field Artillery Battery
    • 5th Field Artillery Battery
    • 6th Field Artillery Battery
    • 102nd Field Artillery (Howitzer) Battery
    • 2nd Brigade Ammunition Column
  • 3rd Field Artillery Brigade August 1914 - 20 January 1917
    • 7th Field Artillery Battery
    • 8th Field Artillery Battery
    • 9th Field Artillery Battery
    • 103rd Field Artillery (Howitzer) Battery
    • 3rd Brigade Ammunition Column
  • 21st Field Artillery (Howitzer) Brigade February 1916 - 23 January 1917
    • 22nd Field Artillery Battery
    • 23rd Field Artillery Battery
    • 24th Field Artillery Battery
    • 116th Field Artillery (Howitzer) Battery
    • 21st Brigade Ammunition Column
  • V1A Heavy Trench Mortar Battery 17 April 1916 - 21 February 1918
  • X1A Medium Trench Mortar Battery 17 April 1916 - 21 February 1918
  • Y1A Medium Trench Mortar Battery 17 April 1916 - 21 February 1918
  • Z1A Medium Trench Mortar Battery 17 April 1916 - 21 February 1918
  • 1st Medium Trench Mortar Battery 21 February 1918 - past November 1918
  • 2nd Medium Trench Mortar Battery 21 February 1918 - past November 1918
  • 1st Heavy Artillery Battery

Read more about Australian Army Artillery Units, World War I:  2nd Division Artillery, 3rd Division Artillery, 4th Division Artillery, 5th Division Artillery, Siege Artillery, Captured Units, Heavy Trench Mortar Batteries, Reserve Units, Training Depot

Famous quotes containing the words war i, world, war, army, australian and/or artillery:

    War is no strife
    To the dark house and the detested wife.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    One of the most significant effects of age-segregation in our society has been the isolation of children from the world of work. Whereas in the past children not only saw what their parents did for a living but even shared substantially in the task, many children nowadays have only a vague notion of the nature of the parent’s job, and have had little or no opportunity to observe the parent, or for that matter any other adult, when he is fully engaged in his work.
    Urie Bronfenbrenner (b. 1917)

    It does not disturb me that those whom I pardon are said to have deserted me so that
    they might again bring war against me. I prefer nothing more than that I should be true to
    myself and they to themselves.
    Julius Caesar [Gaius Julius Caesar] (100–44 B.C.)

    I thought when I was a young man that I would conquer the world with truth. I thought I would lead an army greater than Alexander ever dreamed of. Not to conquer nations, but to liberate mankind. With truth. With the golden sound of the Word. But only a few of them heard. Only a few of you understood. The rest of you put on black and sat in chapel.
    Philip Dunne (1908–1992)

    The Australian mind, I can state with authority, is easily boggled.
    Charles Osborne (b. 1927)

    Another success is the post-office, with its educating energy augmented by cheapness and guarded by a certain religious sentiment in mankind; so that the power of a wafer or a drop of wax or gluten to guard a letter, as it flies over sea over land and comes to its address as if a battalion of artillery brought it, I look upon as a fine meter of civilization.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)