African Americans in The American Revolution

African Americans In The American Revolution

Some African Americans saw the Revolution as a fight for liberty, but their own liberty and freedom from slavery. Others responded to the Dunmore's Proclamation, and fought for their freedom as Black Loyalists. Benjamin Quarles believed that the role of the African American in the American Revolution can be understood by "realizing that loyalty was not to a place or a person, but to a principle". Regardless of where the loyalties of the African American lay, they made a contribution to the birth of the United States that is often disregarded. During the American Revolutionary War, African Americans served both the Continental Army and the British Army. It is estimated that 5,000 African Americans served as soldiers for the Continental army, while more than 20,000 fought for the British cause.

Read more about African Americans In The American RevolutionFree African Americans, Motivating Factors, African American Patriots, African American Sailors, Patriot Resistance To Using African Americans, Lord Dunmore's Proclamation, Military Response To Dunmore's Proclamation, African American Loyalists, Black Regiment of Rhode Island, Aftermath of The War For African Americans, African American Women

Other articles related to "african, african americans, african americans in the american revolution, americans":

Foreign Relations Of Nigeria
... by attachment to several fundamental principles African unity and independence Capability to exercise hegemonic influence in the region peaceful settlement of disputes nonalignment and ... In carrying out these principles, Nigeria participates in the Organization of African Unity (OAU) now known as the African Union, the Economic Community of West ...
History Of Alabama - Disfranchisement and Origins of New South, 1876-1914
... The Republican Party by then was chiefly supported by African Americans ... in 1901 that restricted suffrage and effectively disfranchised African Americans ... The damage to the African-American community was severe and pervasive, as nearly all its eligible citizens lost the ability to vote ...
African Americans In The American Revolution - African American Women
... of whom were slaves, served both the Americans and the British in the capacity of nurses, laundresses and cooks ...
Human Skin Color - Genetics of Skin Color Variation - KITLG
... gene, A326G (rs642742) has been positively associated with variations of skin color in African-Americans of mixed West African and European descent and is estimated to account for 15–20 ... allele occurs in over 80% of European and Asian samples, compared with less than 10% in African samples ...
List Of Religions And Spiritual Traditions - Indigenous Traditional Religions - African
... Main article African traditional religions West Africa Akan mythology Ashanti mythology (Ghana) Dahomey (Fon) mythology Efik mythology (Nigeria, Cameroon) Igbo mythology (Nigeria ...

Famous quotes containing the words revolution, american, americans and/or african:

    When lions paint pictures men will not always be represented as conquerors. When women translate laws, constitutions, bibles and philosophies, man will not always be the declared heard of the church, the state, and the home.
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton 1815–1902, U.S. women’s rights activist, author, editor. The Revolution (August 13, 1868)

    There is not a more disgusting spectacle under the sun than our subserviency to British criticism. It is disgusting, first, because it is truckling, servile, pusillanimous—secondly, because of its gross irrationality. We know the British to bear us little but ill will—we know that, in no case do they utter unbiased opinions of American books ... we know all this, and yet, day after day, submit our necks to the degrading yoke of the crudest opinion that emanates from the fatherland.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1845)

    Most Americans are born drunk, and really require a little wine or beer to sober them. They have a sort of permanent intoxication from within, a sort of invisible champagne.... Americans do not need to drink to inspire them to do anything, though they do sometimes, I think, need a little for the deeper and more delicate purpose of teaching them how to do nothing.
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874–1936)

    Like dreaming, reading performs the prodigious task of carrying us off to other worlds. But reading is not dreaming because books, unlike dreams, are subject to our will: they envelop us in alternative realities only because we give them explicit permission to do so. Books are the dreams we would most like to have, and, like dreams, they have the power to change consciousness, turning sadness to laughter and anxious introspection to the relaxed contemplation of some other time and place.
    Victor Null, South African educator, psychologist. Lost in a Book: The Psychology of Reading for Pleasure, introduction, Yale University Press (1988)