African Americans in The American Revolution

African Americans In The American Revolution

Some African Americans saw the Revolution as a fight for liberty, but their own liberty and freedom from slavery. Others responded to the Dunmore's Proclamation, and fought for their freedom as Black Loyalists. Benjamin Quarles believed that the role of the African American in the American Revolution can be understood by "realizing that loyalty was not to a place or a person, but to a principle". Regardless of where the loyalties of the African American lay, they made a contribution to the birth of the United States that is often disregarded. During the American Revolutionary War, African Americans served both the Continental Army and the British Army. It is estimated that 5,000 African Americans served as soldiers for the Continental army, while more than 20,000 fought for the British cause.

Read more about African Americans In The American RevolutionFree African Americans, Motivating Factors, African American Patriots, African American Sailors, Patriot Resistance To Using African Americans, Lord Dunmore's Proclamation, Military Response To Dunmore's Proclamation, African American Loyalists, Black Regiment of Rhode Island, Aftermath of The War For African Americans, African American Women

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Famous quotes containing the words revolution, american, americans and/or african:

    Every revolution was first a thought in one man’s mind, and when the same thought occurs in another man, it is the key to that era.
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    Gowns, and pecuniary foundations, though of towns of gold, can never countervail the least sentence or syllable of wit. Forget this, and our American colleges will recede in their public importance, whilst they grow richer every year.
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