Who is Harriet Beecher Stowe?

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day.

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Some articles on Harriet Beecher Stowe:

Washington, Kentucky - History
... In 1833, Washington had a visitor who would become famous, Harriet Beecher, who after her marriage was known as Harriet Beecher Stowe ... At the time of her visit, she was still Harriet Beecher and teaching at the Western Female Institute in Cincinnati ... The Key House where Harriet Beecher Stowe stayed is on Main Street in Washington and now contains a museum named the Harriet Beecher Stowe Slavery to Freedom Museum ...
Let Every Man Mind His Own Business - Plot Summary
... Works of Harriet Beecher Stowe 1830s The Mayflower or, Sketches of Scenes and Characters Among the Descendants of the Pilgrims (1834) " Let Every Man Mind His Own Business " (1839) 1850s Uncle ...

Famous quotes containing the words harriet beecher stowe, harriet beecher, beecher stowe, stowe and/or beecher:

    The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Everyone confesses in the abstract that exertion which brings out all the powers of body and mind is the best thing for us all; but practically most people do all they can to get rid of it, and as a general rule nobody does much more than circumstances drive them to do.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    These words dropped into my childish mind as if you should accidentally drop a ring into a deep well. I did not think of them much at the time, but there came a day in my life when the ring was fished up out of the well, good as new.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    The longest day must have its close—the gloomiest night will wear on to a morning. An eternal, inexorable lapse of moments is ever hurrying the day of the evil to an eternal night, and the night of the just to an eternal day.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    When a nation’s young men are conservative, its funeral bell is already rung.
    —Henry Ward Beecher (1813–1887)