Who is Harriet Beecher Stowe?

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day.

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Some articles on Harriet Beecher Stowe:

Washington, Kentucky - History
... Washington had a visitor who would become famous, Harriet Beecher, who after her marriage was known as Harriet Beecher Stowe ... At the time of her visit, she was still Harriet Beecher and teaching at the Western Female Institute in Cincinnati ... The Key House where Harriet Beecher Stowe stayed is on Main Street in Washington and now contains a museum named the Harriet Beecher Stowe Slavery to Freedom Museum ...
Let Every Man Mind His Own Business - Plot Summary
... Works of Harriet Beecher Stowe 1830s The Mayflower or, Sketches of Scenes and Characters Among the Descendants of the Pilgrims (1834) " Let Every Man Mind His Own ...

Famous quotes containing the words harriet beecher stowe, harriet beecher, beecher stowe, stowe, harriet and/or beecher:

    The obstinancy of cleverness and reason is nothing to the obstinancy of folly and inanity.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    A woman’s health is her capital.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    One would like to be grand and heroic, if one could; but if not, why try at all? One wants to be very something, very great, very heroic; or if not that, then at least very stylish and very fashionable. It is this everlasting mediocrity that bores me.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Nobody had ever instructed him that a slave-ship, with a procession of expectant sharks in its wake, is a missionary institution, by which closely-packed heathen are brought over to enjoy the light of the Gospel.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Many Americans imagine simpler times even as a storm of social change swirls about, blowing parents here and children there. Sure, the 1950s ideal world would be wonderful. But knock on the nation’s doors: Ozzie and Harriet are seldom at home.
    Leslie Dreyfous (20th century)

    The ability to secure an independent livelihood and honorable employ suited to her education and capacities is the only true foundation of the social elevation of woman, even in the very highest classes of society. While she continues to be educated only to be somebody’s wife, and is left without any aim in life till that somebody either in love, or in pity, or in selfish regard at last grants her the opportunity, she can never be truly independent.
    —Catherine E. Beecher (1800–1878)