Yale University - Yale in Fiction and Popular Culture

Yale in Fiction and Popular Culture

Further information: List of Yale University people and Yale in popular culture

Yale University, one of the oldest universities in the United States, is a cultural referent as an institution that produces some of the most elite members of society and its grounds, alumni, and students have been prominently portrayed in fiction and U.S. popular culture. For example, Owen Johnson's novel, Stover at Yale, follows the college career of Dink Stover and Frank Merriwell, the model for all later juvenile sports fiction, plays football, baseball, crew, and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. Yale University was also mentioned in F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby". Nick Carraway and Tom Buchanan have both graduated from New Haven. The narrator (the former) has written a series of editorials for the Yale News and the following has been "one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven".

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Famous quotes containing the words yale, fiction, popular and/or culture:

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